What it’s like Traveling with Miranda

Cruising with Miranda: Summer 2019

Published November 6, 2019

Editor’s note: If you’ve been following the adventures of Miranda, you’ll know that she tours the seas aboard PaNNTOA members’ boats. Her adventures have been chronicled in a lovely album, updated for member’s enjoyment for each annual rendezvous. This year, we’re posting Miranda’s story on the web site for all to enjoy. Miranda recently returned to port following a 2-month journey north this year with Doug and Lindsey Ford. Here’s Lindsey’s report:

Wind and seas were calm nearly every day, and Miranda claims she’s never slept so well. The days were particularly relaxing thanks to the extensive reading library we brought along. Miranda took advantage of it throughout the trip.

There were also new adventures on the way north. We saw more wildlife this summer than before. We encountered Orcas feeding and after crossing Cape Caution and observed a pair of loons doing their mating dance one early AM in a remote cove. Miranda didn’t say much, and we didn’t discuss details with her, but she seemed to think the birds looked a bit silly.

Late in June, we hiked to a lovely beach that felt like we were in the tropics. Miranda wanted to spend more time sunning herself than we were inclined to do, but she’d been such a good guest we indulged her for a couple of hours.

In search of fresh water, and curious to see the abandoned village, we eventually motored north to Ocean Falls (our northern-most destination). Disinterested in abandoned places, Miranda declined a tour ashore but agreed to pose with Ocean Falls behind her as we turned south.

On the return trip south, we crossed routes with Dave and Jeri Starrett and had a good dinner aboard in Sointula. Miranda was a delightful dinner guest, although a bit less talkative than usual.

And the next day, as we entered Johnstone Strait, we were accompanied by dolphins who swam at our bow for 20 minutes...simply magical! Miranda wanted to join them, but we were concerned she might not want to get back on the boat, so we talked her out of it.

Miranda was an easy guest to have aboard and she’s hoping to get back out on the water soon.

Lindsey

PS We loved our time with Miranda, but in fairness to her future hosts, we can’t recommend her as an extra hand on deck. It’s not her fault, and while we didn’t want to pry, it seems she’s unable to move her arms. It created an awkward situation when she volunteered to help with the lines at John Henry’s in Pender Harbor. Just wanted to let you know in advance….

 

For more photos of Miranda on the go, check out this scrapbook.

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Nordic Tug Owners Support Marine Trade Training at Skagit Valley College

Nordic Tug Owners Support Marine Trade Training at Skagit Valley College

Published November 4, 2019

Capping off our annual rendezvous in May, PaNNTOA members held a charitable auction to benefit students in the Marine Maintenance Technology program at Skagit Valley College (SVC) Generous participants raised nearly $5000 to help fund scholarship and tuition assistance for students preparing for careers in marine trades.

A natural choice for PaNNTOA members

Choosing the SVC program was a natural choice for our auction proceeds. What better way to support the Nordic Tug community than help train the next generation of experts to help us maintain our beloved boats? The Northwest’s strong marine maintenance, repair, and manufacturing industries fuel a high demand for skilled marine technicians. The SVC Marine Maintenance Technology program prepares students for employment in marine propulsion, vessel systems, and marine composites.

The Skagit Valley program has close partnerships with marine manufacturers and service companies. Students train with a faculty of experienced industry experts, led by Department Chair Mike Beemer, pictured here accepting PaNNTOA’s gift check from Commodore Gary White. Students work and learn in the well-equipped lab of the Marine Technology Center – a modern, purpose-built facility near Fidalgo Bay in Anacortes. They can work toward a one-year certificate, a two-year AAS degree, and credentials from American Boat & Yacht Council (ABYC), National Marine Electronics Association (NMEA), and American Composites Manufacturers Association (ACMA).

At this summer’s rendezvous, 85 members enjoyed not only the charity auction and lots of fun and camaraderie, but also exceptional boating-related information and training presentations, first mate training, excellent meals (provided by Gere-a-Deli in Anacortes), and onboard consultations with Nordic Tug factory representatives and LaConner Maritime technicians.

The broader maritime community joined in the giving. In addition to the Nordic Tug owners, many generous maritime businesses contributed to the success of the PaNNTOA auction and rendezvous: Nordic Tugs, which builds their vessels in Burlington; Cap Sante Marina (host of PaNNTOA’s rendezvous); Gateway Yachts; LaConner Maritime; Alt Insurance Group; Garmin; Rainman Watermaker; SeaKeeper; Yacht Controller; Marine Detail Specialists; Fisheries Supply; and over a dozen Salish Sea marinas stretching from Arabella’s in Gig Harbor and Dock Street in Tacoma all the way north to Heriot Bay, Blind Channel, and Dent Island.

To learn more about SVC’s Marine Maintenance Technology program, go to https://www.skagit.edu/academics/areas-of-study/industrial-technology-transportation/#marine-maintenance-technology-degrees-and-courses

To learn more about Nordic Tugs, go to https://www.nordictugs.com/

To learn more about PaNNTOA, go to https://panntoa.com/

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