Mike Young

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  • in reply to: 2021 Rendezvous #14064
    Mike Young
    Participant

    Keep a lookout for a new email today – more details on our chill Mini-Vous. Coming up soon (9/9), so make your slip rez now!

    Mike

    in reply to: Olympia mini vous #14063
    Mike Young
    Participant

    Keep a lookout for a new email today – more details on our chill Mini-Vous. Coming up soon, so make your slip rez now!

    Mike

    in reply to: Depth finder/transducer issue #13974
    Mike Young
    Participant

    Mike, I see that Gary White has already shared some suggestions. I passed your post on to Larry Schildwachter, head of Emerald Harbor Marine in Seattle. Larry & his crew have done well by us & our boats over almost 20 years (including our current Nordic Tug 42). He was kind enough to share several ideas. Please keep in mind that he hasn’t been aboard your boat to check this out and I’m just giving you his top-of-the-head thoughts without any obligation on you or on Larry:

    “We can try and help. If the transducer is actually bad, then the vessel will need to be hauled. Have them try the sounder with the engine off and see if it still fails. Could be RF stray noise. Could be a bad transducer. Could be connectivity. Ask them if all their Garmin devices have been updated with the most current revisions.”

    Larry’s “engine off” idea may sound just like Gary’s “stop the boat” idea, but it isn’t. Each of these ideas could help you troubleshoot, but they’re aimed at identifying different potential problems.

    In case you do want to get Larry’s help, this is his contact information: 206-793-7950 (cell), larry@emharbor.com. Again, Larry understands that you haven’t hired him – I’m just trying to help you out.

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 3 months ago by Mike Young.
    in reply to: PaNNTOA’s First Galley Chef Recipe Contest #13906
    Mike Young
    Participant

    Laura’s Dungeness Crab Enchiladas

    Laura Domela – Panntoa member of slowboat.com fame – just finished judging Panntoa’s Galley Chef Recipe Contest. She also generously shared one of her own recipes for other Panntoa members to enjoy:

    Laura's Crab Enchiladas

    Ingredients:

    A couple large handfuls of fresh crab (about a pound)
    Cream Cheese (6-8 oz)
    Shredded Mexican cheese blend, or jack cheese and/or cheddar cheese, your choice
    Chopped garlic (I use 4-5 cloves)
    Shallots (1-2 medium/large, diced)
    Fresh jalapeños (1-2 Tbsp or so chopped, and more sliced thin for garnish)
    Fresh spinach
    Tortillas, corn or flour
    Green enchilada sauce or salsa verde
    Tomatoes, sliced thin to garnish (optional)
    Olive oil for sautéing
    Sour cream (optional)
    Chopped fresh cilantro (optional)

    Chopped green onions (optional)

     

    Directions:

    Preheat oven to 350-375.

     

    Heat about a Tbsp or so of olive oil in a large, non stick frying pan over medium heat (this frying pan will hold all of your filling, including crab, in the end, to pick a big enough pan). When oil is hot, add diced shallots, chopped garlic, and chopped jalapeño. Sauté until translucent but not brown. Add a couple handfuls of fresh spinach until wilted. Add cream cheese and lower heat, stirring until it’s all melty. Then add crab and a handful or so of grated Mexican cheese. Stir to blend.

    Spray a glass or metal 9×13 pan with olive oil or other nonstick spray, and lay/arrange the tortillas in the pan like taco shells with the open side up. I usually end up using flour tortillas, because they’re the right size to fit across the width of the pan I normally use.  If you prefer corn tortillas, just layer them so the edges of the outermost tortillas are touching either side of the pan, width-wise.

    Start portioning out the crab/cheese/spinach filling into the tortillas until you’re satisfied they’re all filled somewhat equally. If you need more filling, add some fresh spinach before rolling up. I usually start at one end of the pan and roll the enchiladas so the opening of the tortilla lengthwise is on the bottom of the pan. Once you’re finished rolling, top with green enchilada sauce (jarred tomatillo salsa works fine too…but I find that red sauce a bit strong for the crab). I like to have enough sauce so that there’s sauce along the edges and in the cracks between the enchiladas, but it doesn’t have to totally cover the enchiladas. I use my spatula along the edges of the pan to sort of pull away so sauce gets down in there a little more. Top with a bit more grated cheese, and then add thin sliced tomatoes and thin sliced jalapeños for color/design. Bake at about 350-375 until the cheese is bubbly. Let rest a couple minutes, then serve. Top with sour cream and chopped cilantro and or sliced green onions.

    Notes:

    This recipe is forgiving and endlessly customizable. Omit jalapeños if you want it less spicy. Use cilantro in the filling AND as a garnish. Add shrimp if you don’t have enough crab. Cut back on the cheese and add more seafood. Tomatoes in the filling instead of on top. I’ve used the jars of Frontera Tomatillo Salsa instead of enchilada sauce and it works just as well.

    I came up with an earlier version of this recipe on our first trip to Alaska in 2015 when we were catching more crab than we knew what to do with. It’s been revised and improved over the years, and as you can tell, I still haven’t worked out the amounts, but like I said earlier, it’s fairly forgiving.

    If you make the full version and have leftovers, wrap a couple leftover portions in foil. They reheat nicely in the oven. (Honestly, they’re even pretty great cold in the morning for breakfast.)

    The photo above from our NT42 galley: a large pan of enchiladas for our flotilla group, plus two individual pans for the vegetarians on board (made with zucchini, spinach, and probably some beans). 🙂

    in reply to: Pilot house doors scream at me! #13904
    Mike Young
    Participant

    Shawn, another product that has worked well to keep our pilot house doors sliding smoothly & quietly is white lithium grease (spray can), sprayed on the raised rail in the bottom door track (that the door rides on).  Haven’t compared it head-to-head with McLube, so I’m not suggesting it’s superior – but an effective alternative.

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 4 months ago by Mike Young.
    in reply to: NT 32 OWNERS – is selling a possibility? #13515
    Mike Young
    Participant

    I’ve been informed that Eric has now found his new-to-him Nordic Tug in the Bay Area, so this search is over. He very much appreciated being able to include Panntoa members in his search.

    in reply to: Single handing a 32/34 #13385
    Mike Young
    Participant

    Greg, I’ve started to respond to your post several times and refrained; there’s enough difference among individual mariners that my perceptions/attitudes may not be relevant or appropriate for someone else. With that caveat, though, I’ll join those who encourage installation/use of a thruster, to make life easier and more relaxing when single-handing a Nordic Tug in tight quarters.

    In my experience, a single-engine inboard powerboat is more challenging “in close” than an auxiliary sailboat, a single-engine inboard/outboard powerboat, a single-engine outboard, or a twin-screw powerboat. And, in windy conditions, that challenge increases with your “sail area”; our flybridge NT 42 captures a lot of wind, for example. When we bought it (used), it had both a bow and stern thruster already installed. Based on a lot of experience (well over a half century) single-handing all of the pleasure craft configurations I mentioned, I initially thought I wouldn’t be using the thrusters much. (That had been true in our significantly larger Ocean Alexander, for example, despite many dozens of single-handed trips through the Ballard Locks.) But 4 years into our very positive experience with our Nordic Tug, I use at least one of the thrusters pretty regularly, especially in mooring situations when there’s a significant (or fluky) cross-wind or cross-current. (We’ve moored 3 of our boats at Elliott Bay over the years; I’m a real fan of that marina and its management, but I have to agree with your description of the mooring challenges.)

    in reply to: Protruding swim ladder #13160
    Mike Young
    Participant

    Dave, the swim ladder on our NT (a 42) hangs out (maybe 2-3″?) aft of the swim step too. I studied it in the boatyard last Feb, and looked at it again when I was swimming around the boat this last week. But I haven’t found any means to adjust it. We don’t have our dinghy back there, so it isn’t creating the rubbing problem you described, but it does occasionally overcome the friction and slip farther aft (so it’s sticking out more than usual). I haven’t communicated with the manufacturer of the ladder.

    in reply to: 2007 NT 37 Flybridge for sale in vancouver #12504
    Mike Young
    Participant

    Congratulations on your new Tug!

    Mike Young

    in reply to: Emergency Steering? #12468
    Mike Young
    Participant

    That’s sure an important question, Tim – I hope your post draws some informative/constructive responses for all of us!

    Mike Young

    in reply to: Venting? #11419
    Mike Young
    Participant

    Tim, other thoughts on your questions: (1) Ventilation: Serious wind/rain are almost always from the south where we moor our boat (near Seattle), so it’s pretty safe for us to leave windows/portlights open (at least partially) if they aren’t south-facing.  Of course I don’t know the wind patterns in your area – whether predictable, etc.  (2) Refrigerator: Fred Young mentioned a presentation on refrigeration, solar power, etc. at the May/June 2019 Rendezvous.  The presenter was excellent – Woody Wentworth. His business is Ice Boat Marine, and focuses on refrigeration and electrical issues.  The slides from his presentation are posted here on the Panntoa website: https://panntoa.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/Solar-Refrig-Nordic-Tug-Rondie-2019v.1.pdf.  (You can also get to his slides by clicking on “EVENTS” at the top of the web page; then choose “2019 Panntoa Rendezvous,” then “”2019 Rendezvous Presentations”; then scroll down to the “Solar & Refrigeration” presentation.)  Like any presenter, he could share only a small fraction of all he knows in the limited time budget for his presentation, and slides only capture of fraction of what he covered.  Even so, you’ll probably learn something from his slides; the refrigeration stuff is about 3/4 of the way through the slides, and there’s a telling chart earlier in the slides showing typical electrical power usage – the refrigerator is the biggest amp-guzzler by far for most boats. If you connect with him, he can likely help you in a useful direction based on your specifics.  I think he operates Ice Boat Marine out of Anacortes; another outfit that has an excellent reputation for refrigeration (and other) boat systems is Sure Marine, in Ballard (Seattle).

     

    in reply to: Sept, 2019 Mini-Vous at Port Browning, Canada #10894
    Mike Young
    Participant

    If you moor your NT in the US and are thinking about cruising to this Port Browning Mini-Vous, will you please let me know?  I’d like to explore buddy-boating – from Seattle or any US port north of Seattle (including Anacortes).  Thanks a lot!

    Mike Young

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)